The Future of DTM

The 2020 DTM season was the last to be run with class one cars and from 2021 the DTM will be run with sports cars based on the FIA GT3 regulations. This change was brought in to open up the competition to a wider range of manufacturers as most already build GT3 spec cars.

Expect to see the likes of Aston Martin, Bentley, Corvette, Ferrari, Honda, Lamborghini, Lexus, Mercedes, Nissan, Porsche as well as Audi and BMW on the grid.

There will also be a change in the way races are started with a new ‘DTM Formations Start’ which will be a rolling double-file start similar to the IndyCar race starts. A new ‘balance of performance’ (BOP) system which will be circuit-specific, will equal out the field and provide closer and more competitive racing. This BOP system has already been tested in the 2020 DTM Trophy season and worked so well that it will be a part of the 2021 DTM season.   

GT3 Style Cars as used in the GT World Challenge

The use of driver aids such as ABS and traction control will remain as will the format of one driver to each car racing two sprint races of 55 minutes plus one lap.

In addition to the main DTM races, there will be an independent race series of all-electric cars. These will be tested at a few of the race weekends in 2021 with the full race season planned for 2023. It promises spectacular racing with powerful, efficient and fast cars, a cost-effective modular concept and safety at the highest level. The pan is for 30 sprint races and the possibility of automated battery changes during a mandatory pit stop.

The Future is Electric!
Credit: DTM

2021 DTM schedule:

28–30 May – Igora Drive, St. Petersburg (RUS)*

11–13 or 18-20 June – Monza (ITA)

2–4 July – Norisring (GER)

23–25 July – DEKRA Lausitzring Grand Prix (GER)

6–8 August – Zolder (BEL)

20–22 August – Nürburgring (GER)

3–5 September – Red Bull Ring (AUT)

17–19 September – Assen (NED)

1–3 October – Hockenheim (GER)

* – to be confirmed / subject to approval by FIA

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